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Complementary Healthcare Information Service - UK

3 important things we need for making positive changes.

Article written by Lorna Johnson

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How often have you decided you're going to make a change in your life? Perhaps you've wanted to lose weight, stop smoking, run a marathon, change careers or any number of things, only to find you've give up before you've even started!

This could be due to any number of factors such as an unforeseeable problem or event, lack of self belief, or simply trouble sticking to a plan. We often want things now without having to put too much effort in, and in today's have it all' society, we can often get what we want immediately without minimum effort required.

However, when it comes to making fundamental changes in our lives, things aren't so easy and we do have to make an effort to find the success we desire. For example, we can't lose weight simply by thinking about it, there is always a level of commitment and focus required.

Research suggests that there are three main features that reinforce success: Patience, Perseverance and Resilience. All three traits allow us to stick to our goals and achieve our desired outcomes.

1.      Patience; according to the Oxford dictionary is the capacity to accept or tolerate delay, problems, or suffering, without becoming annoyed or anxious'.

We need patience to support us during tough times, and especially when we want to make fundamental change in our lives. Patience also gives us the time to perfect our skills and experience and teaches us to take control, plan, organise and prepare for success with realistic expectations. After all, patience is a virtue, right! 

2.      Perseverance; never giving up, no matter how rough things may get.

Perseverance enables us to continue even if things seem insurmountable. Even if we fail at times on our journey to success, perseverance enables us to pick ourselves up and continue. We always learn from our mistakes and as long as we persevere we will achieve what we set out to do. How else can we learn if not from our mistakes! It's worth noting that Walt Disney was fired from his first job because he lacked originality and imagination! It certainly didn't stop him, and in all probability inspired him to succeed.

3.      Flexibility; the ability to adapt readily to change, be it beneficial or otherwise.

If we allow ourselves to make changes, or compromise when necessary we can adjust our position or thinking until new opportunities present themselves, even in the face of adversity. Flexibility also allows us to see things from different perspectives and often creates new possibilities that we may have otherwise missed.

Steven Spielberg was apparently rejected three times from the University of Southern California School of Theater, Film and Television. Now that is how to practice patience, perseverance and flexibility.   

Successful people never give up, they see their goal and they commit fully until they've achieved that which they seek. This not only creates a positive mental attitude but reinforces self esteem, confidence, and a healthy dose of well-being.

We can't make things happen just by wishing it was so, we need to use all three of the above characteristics to achieve our goals. It would be nice to drop a dress size in a day or become an accomplished author in a week, but by practicing these three attributes we can gain so much more than we may have imagined. And just think how much more interesting our lives would become. We may not be the next Walt Disney or Steven Spielberg, but who knows!

Here's to your success. 

About the author:

Lorna johnson is a fully qualified Advanced Clinical Hypnotherapist specialising in anxiety and its related conditions. 

Website: http://johnson-hypnotherapy.co.uk/index.html

copyright © Lorna Johnson

 

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